Thing 20: File sharing and online storage

robinson crusoe

You’ve set the date, you’ve had your meeting, and you’ve set SMART objectives: it’s time to start sharing resources. Now we’re going to look at tools which support online collaboration and file-sharing. As well as among groups, there are also benefits to using these tools for your individual work.

It can be frustrating to work on group documents; keeping track of versions is difficult, and emailing updates around every day can be time consuming. Being able to store and edit documents online can help solve these problems, and tools such Google Drive (formerly Google Docs), WeTransfer and Dropbox make it possible.

Google Drive

One of the main purposes of Google Drive is to allow multiple people to edit the same document, spreadsheet or presentation without creating duplicate copies. Documents can either be uploaded or created from scratch within Google Drive and the fact that everyone can access the file in one place means that it is much simpler to edit and update. This can be very useful for researchers who are collaborating on a project; for example, drafting a research publication with multiple authors.

Task

Accessing Google Drive is quite straightforward. Simply login with the same username and password that you would use to access your Google account. If you don’t have a Google account, you can quickly set one up by clicking here and completing the online form.

Once you have logged in to Google Drive, click ‘Create’ and choose what kind of document you would like to create – such as a spreadsheet, word-processing document or a presentation.

Create your document and it will save automatically, or you can force a save by pressing Ctrl+S.

Now you are ready to share your document, either with a colleague or even with another 23 Things participant if you wish! Click on the ‘Share’ button in the top right-hand corner of the screen. In the ‘Add People’ box, enter the email address of the person with whom you would like to share the document and decide whether you will allow them to edit the document or just to view it. Click ‘Share’ and this person will now receive an email with a direct link to your document.

You can have multiple people editing the document at once, live – which can be confusing but also a great way to kick ideas around, especially to support an online meeting.

WeTransfer

If you’re not collaborating on a document but need to send large files to someone else, WeTransfer provides a great free service to get around the hassle of using multiple emails. All you need to do is enter the recipient’s email and your own, upload the files and enter an explanatory note if you wish. You receive a notification once the files have been received and downloaded, and WeTransfer automatically delete all files after 30 days. The free version lets you send up to 2GB at once, and store up to 500GB. you can upgrade to ‘Plus’ if you need to get remove these restrictions.

ark

Dropbox
Dropbox is another free application (available on mobile and on desktop) which allows you to store your documents online so that you can access them from multiple computers.

Like Google Drive, Dropbox can also be used when collaborating with others on a project as it enables easy file-sharing without the need for creating duplicates. For example, one person can drop documents and files into Dropbox and then invite other people to access and edit those files.

Task

If you don’t already have a Dropbox account, go to the Dropbox website and create one. Once you have created an account, you will be directed to a page that explains how to download Dropbox, although you can continue using the online service if you wish.

After you have downloaded and installed Dropbox, you will have a Dropbox folder on your computer where you can store any files that you want to share with others. You can access these files from any computer by logging into the Dropbox website with your username and password. From here, you can view, download and upload files securely using any web browser.

Sharing documents using Dropbox
Sharing with someone who already has a Dropbox account
Create a new folder inside your Dropbox folder, select a file from your computer and paste it into this folder. Now go to the Dropbox website, log in if you aren’t already logged in and click on the tab called ‘Sharing’.

Select the option to share an existing folder, click ‘next’ and then select your folder. Enter the email address of someone with whom you wish to share your folder and click ‘share folder’. This will send an email inviting the recipient to view your folder via Dropbox. If the recipient is not yet a member of Dropbox, the email will direct them to a page asking them to register.

Sharing with someone who does not have a Dropbox account
Dropbox will also allow you to share single files (but not folders) with people who do not have a Dropbox account. To do this, simply copy and paste a file into the folder called ‘Public’ which is already inside the Dropbox folder on your computer.

Next, navigate to your Public folder via your account on the Dropbox website, right-click on the file you want and select ‘Copy public link’. This will give you a URL which links to your file and you can then paste this, for example, into emails or blog posts in order to share it with others.

Further reading

 

 

Week 10 blog post

Write about your first impressions of any or all of these tools and/or their potential uses for your work. If you are already using one or more of them, you could write about the kinds of projects for which they have been useful. If you wish, you could also compare and contrast the value of each of these different tools and consider how they could be used to further your own professional development.

 

dog2

“There has got to be an easier was to do this…”
Advertisements

Author: rdpsurrey

Providing personal and professional development opportunities to researchers at the University of Surrey.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s